Triple Blocks – Details

Another post on pulleys? When I first started lifting logs, I used a chain hoist, some antique #8 pulleys, and some homemade pulleys when I couldn’t find any more antique pulleys. Pulleys that are rated for more than 3,000 pounds are surprisingly hard to find, and the ones you do find can cost over $400 per block. Pulleys are rare because everyone hires a crane or uses a telehandler to lift heavy stuff anymore. If you are having trouble finding a telehandler due to the recent construction boom, you may want to consider using block and tackle. A set of … Continue reading Triple Blocks – Details

Installing Exterior Doors

This is a follow-up post on building your own exterior doors, which was covered in my last post. Building doors is a satisfying project. It can be tedious and sometimes stressful, but only in the sense that you want to make sure things are exact. If done correctly, the end result will bring you satisfaction for years to come. In this post, I’ll discuss installing doors in door frames and some issues we ran into with hardware for custom doors. Door Frames A lot of videos I watched on door frames made it seem complicated. None of them covered exactly … Continue reading Installing Exterior Doors

First Exterior Door Frame

The Setup We’ll have three exterior doors. The first one is on the actual back side of the house. We wanted a door with a large window in it so plenty of light can come into the house, and also so we can look out into the backyard. The next one will be on the side of the house in the kitchen. This will be a utility entrance – pull into the carport, drag all the groceries out of the car and use this entrance to bring things into the kitchen. The front door will be the formal entrance. Use … Continue reading First Exterior Door Frame

Roof – Part 4 of 4: Shingles

Whew. That was hard. I’m now officially “under roof”. I knew the roof would be a multi-part series, but it was more long and drawn out than I thought. I am now far behind my goal for finishing the home in 2-3 years. In fact, I thought back in October that I might be able to finish the roof by the end of 2018. We are now halfway through 2019. On the bright side, I’m still within budget, and now that the roof is done, I can take a breather and finish projects I left hanging like installing a motor … Continue reading Roof – Part 4 of 4: Shingles

Part II: Rafters up- new crane guy

Click here to read Part I (where we get the Ridge Pole up) They sent Chad out to help.  He asked me about the the guy who set the Ridge Pole (RP). I told him the guy’s name, and he laughed- “Oh, yeah, good ol’ Be***! That guy’s afraid of his own shadow.” I was immediately at ease with Chad. Here’s a guy who knows that stuff like this is dangerous, and harping on it doesn’t make anyone safer. We all know it’s dangerous, and we do it anyway, but we try to work smart. I told him the plan. … Continue reading Part II: Rafters up- new crane guy

I’m back on WordPress…

Hi everyone- I thought I had made my last post and was moving over to my other blog on google-owned Blogger. But with all the censorship over gun videos on YouTube (owned by Google, and they also own Blogger- where my new blog was going to be)  –  I’ve changed my mind again. I’ll explain… The problem is that I have principles that I support – like freedom of speech- that are being attacked by the sites that host my videos and the other blog. They are now refusing to allow videos that show how guns are made and how … Continue reading I’m back on WordPress…

It’s been a weird month

I cut 6 more trees I measure trees by their diameter (straight across the butt of the log), while Julie measures the circumference (with a tape all the way around the butt of the log).  Either way is fine, but since she’s picking the logs, we’re going with her measurement. The idea in the beginning was to stack logs from biggest circumference to smallest circumference. We got started on the second level, and were at a point where the circumference was about to drop below five feet. And then get skinny dramatically. There were still some big ones here and … Continue reading It’s been a weird month

Almost done with 1st floor logs

  We’re nearing another crossroads- the logs are about 12 feet off the ground, which means they are about 9 feet up from the piers, and about 8 feet up from the finished floor height. All of which means we have to start thinking about the second floor. But first, I’ll summarize what’s happened since my last post. Improving techniques Jack hammer is pretty good The jack hammer cost me about $130. I don’t know if it’s a monster jack hammer or just a regular one, having never owned a jack hammer before now. But it is definitely heavy- I … Continue reading Almost done with 1st floor logs

Up to the 4th Course

The method Each complete layer of logs (made up of all the logs that are on the same level) is called a “course”. The logs are oriented in alternating pin-wheel courses- and by pinwheel, I mean at each corner, one end of each log “passes” a log that is “butted” up against  it. On the next course, you reverse the butts and passes at that same corner, and on and on. Each log is pinned with rebar to the layer below- every 2 feet. I won’t bore you with too many of the details, but it is a lot of … Continue reading Up to the 4th Course