Triple Blocks – Details

Another post on pulleys? When I first started lifting logs, I used a chain hoist, some antique #8 pulleys, and some homemade pulleys when I couldn’t find any more antique pulleys. Pulleys that are rated for more than 3,000 pounds are surprisingly hard to find, and the ones you do find can cost over $400 per block. Pulleys are rare because everyone hires a crane or uses a telehandler to lift heavy stuff anymore. If you are having trouble finding a telehandler due to the recent construction boom, you may want to consider using block and tackle. A set of … Continue reading Triple Blocks – Details

Gutters!

I didn’t think I would do gutters. In some parts of the LHBA world, gutters are a dirty word. The thinking goes like this: with enough roof overhangs – usually 4′ for each story, and 8′ on the gable ends, gutters aren’t needed. I’ve mentioned before that the finished home will have wrap around porches, thus the reason I only have 4 foot overhangs on my two-story house. I found out about a month ago why, when the wind blows, the rain still comes in – even though I have the roof finished. Mosseyme says without the chinking, the gaps … Continue reading Gutters!

How to use Ropes & Knots to build a log cabin by hand

I’ve always been intrigued with rope and string, and the many uses for it. A few years ago, I even took up knitting, and I’ve come up with my own designs for socks, sweaters, hats and scarfs. The idea that clothing can be made simply by looping string together is quite astounding when you think about it. And building a cabin with ropes and pulleys is a fascinating step back in time. Some of the pulleys I used were 100 year old antiques I found on Ebay. But I made others myself.  Now that I’m all but done using ropes, … Continue reading How to use Ropes & Knots to build a log cabin by hand

Roof – Part 4 of 4: Shingles

Whew. That was hard. I’m now officially “under roof”. I knew the roof would be a multi-part series, but it was more long and drawn out than I thought. I am now far behind my goal for finishing the home in 2-3 years. In fact, I thought back in October that I might be able to finish the roof by the end of 2018. We are now halfway through 2019. On the bright side, I’m still within budget, and now that the roof is done, I can take a breather and finish projects I left hanging like installing a motor … Continue reading Roof – Part 4 of 4: Shingles

Roof – Part 3: Installing almost everything on the roof

box frame for insulation almost complete The shingle elevator was made out of wood, and it broke after the week of rain weakened it. So I welded a new one. It works better, but I’m worried about the rails it rides, which are 22 foot long 2×10’s. I’ve made a lot of progress on the roof- the frame is complete, the insulation is completely installed on both sides. I had to stop and measure how much insulation I had left- and use the hot wire foam cutter to cut the 9″ thick pieces down to size – they were too … Continue reading Roof – Part 3: Installing almost everything on the roof

Roof – Part 2: Insulation and other materials

What is a Built Up Roof?   This style of roof is also known as a cathedral roof or ceiling. But the simplest answer is a built up roof is a roof where the insulation is on top of what you see from the inside – different from a roof where the insulation is inside and below the roof. A log home can be built with a conventional roof, but nobody wants to walk into a log home and look up to a white dry wall ceiling. Besides, according to a lot of folks who’ve done both styles- the built … Continue reading Roof – Part 2: Insulation and other materials

Shipping Container

I thought the process of getting a shipping container would be straightforward, but like everything else, it was quite a stressful adventure. How to store your stuff From the beginning, we’ve worried about our stuff getting stolen. So far, I’ve lost a critter cam that was aimed at my tractor, some gas cans, some tow chains and two chain binders. I think it’s a theft of convenience. Our property backs up to some woods, and the woods back up to someone’s backyard, and beyond that is a trailer park. Our neighbor says that people have been walking from the trailer … Continue reading Shipping Container

How to make your own triple blocks for less than $45

Why a triple block? Why not a double? or a single? Because two triple blocks working together gives you a 7:1 mechanical advantage- 5,000 lb log requires only ~720 lbs of force to lift. And you can use just 5/8″ thick rope to lift 720 lbs. A double block would only reduce the force down to 1,250 lb. But you have to double that- for each end of the log. And a single……ummmmm…..there’s no mechanical advantage to a single. Stop talking about single pulleys. On the other end, a “quadruple” block doesn’t really exist beyond huge construction cranes with wire … Continue reading How to make your own triple blocks for less than $45