Triple Blocks – Details

Another post on pulleys? When I first started lifting logs, I used a chain hoist, some antique #8 pulleys, and some homemade pulleys when I couldn’t find any more antique pulleys. Pulleys that are rated for more than 3,000 pounds are surprisingly hard to find, and the ones you do find can cost over $400 per block. Pulleys are rare because everyone hires a crane or uses a telehandler to lift heavy stuff anymore. If you are having trouble finding a telehandler due to the recent construction boom, you may want to consider using block and tackle. A set of … Continue reading Triple Blocks – Details

Cap Logs Installed!

Our cap logs are installed- this means we are almost ready to enter a new phase of construction. It has been a long hard road. Some folks at LHBA claim we are moving at “one gear below breakneck speed” using our lifting poles, but it often doesn’t feel that way… What are cap logs? Cap logs are the final logs on the walls. In the photo above, they are the ones that stick way out on the front of the house. Paired with ‘double-butt logs’, they hold up the roof rafters, and give the roof enough overhang to protect the … Continue reading Cap Logs Installed!

I’m back on WordPress…

Hi everyone- I thought I had made my last post and was moving over to my other blog on google-owned Blogger. But with all the censorship over gun videos on YouTube (owned by Google, and they also own Blogger- where my new blog was going to be)  –  I’ve changed my mind again. I’ll explain… The problem is that I have principles that I support – like freedom of speech- that are being attacked by the sites that host my videos and the other blog. They are now refusing to allow videos that show how guns are made and how … Continue reading I’m back on WordPress…

It’s been a weird month

I cut 6 more trees I measure trees by their diameter (straight across the butt of the log), while Julie measures the circumference (with a tape all the way around the butt of the log).  Either way is fine, but since she’s picking the logs, we’re going with her measurement. The idea in the beginning was to stack logs from biggest circumference to smallest circumference. We got started on the second level, and were at a point where the circumference was about to drop below five feet. And then get skinny dramatically. There were still some big ones here and … Continue reading It’s been a weird month

Almost done with 1st floor logs

  We’re nearing another crossroads- the logs are about 12 feet off the ground, which means they are about 9 feet up from the piers, and about 8 feet up from the finished floor height. All of which means we have to start thinking about the second floor. But first, I’ll summarize what’s happened since my last post. Improving techniques Jack hammer is pretty good The jack hammer cost me about $130. I don’t know if it’s a monster jack hammer or just a regular one, having never owned a jack hammer before now. But it is definitely heavy- I … Continue reading Almost done with 1st floor logs

Up to the 4th Course

The method Each complete layer of logs (made up of all the logs that are on the same level) is called a “course”. The logs are oriented in alternating pin-wheel courses- and by pinwheel, I mean at each corner, one end of each log “passes” a log that is “butted” up against  it. On the next course, you reverse the butts and passes at that same corner, and on and on. Each log is pinned with rebar to the layer below- every 2 feet. I won’t bore you with too many of the details, but it is a lot of … Continue reading Up to the 4th Course

How to make your own triple blocks for less than $45

Why a triple block? Why not a double? or a single? Because two triple blocks working together gives you a 7:1 mechanical advantage- 5,000 lb log requires only ~720 lbs of force to lift. And you can use just 5/8″ thick rope to lift 720 lbs. A double block would only reduce the force down to 1,250 lb. But you have to double that- for each end of the log. And a single……ummmmm…..there’s no mechanical advantage to a single. Stop talking about single pulleys. On the other end, a “quadruple” block doesn’t really exist beyond huge construction cranes with wire … Continue reading How to make your own triple blocks for less than $45

1st layer done

This is a great feeling- The lifting poles worked, the pulleys and chain hoists worked, we figured out the kinks and got all four logs on the piers. It looks less like a grave yard with tombstones sticking up, and more like a….well, at least a perimeter with big posts sticking out of it: There was a little preparation required before setting the logs down on the piers: That’s pressure treated #2 pine – 2×12 from the local hardware store, laying on top of a shingle (90lb builder’s felt) that I sourced from the county dump (they were new in … Continue reading 1st layer done