Floor Joists – Part III: subfloor

In the last post, I finished the joist installation. Before installing the 4×8 3/4″ OSB panels for the subfloor, I wanted to get everything as near as possible to level. The set up The 2×12 double beams are made out of 20 foot long boards. They are not perfectly straight over that distance. When I installed them, I checked carefully for any crown in the boards, and placed it up. But you don’t want your joists following the crown of the beam. I used a water level to level the joists, and followed that line when installing them. The idea … Continue reading Floor Joists – Part III: subfloor

Floor joists – Part II: beams and joists

The setup With the rim joists installed, it was time to install the two double beams. They are 20 foot 2×12’s sandwiched together with 1/2″ bolts and nuts, there are 4 boards in each of them, and they span 40 feet across the house, supported by 5 piers each. There are two of these beams. I decided to install one, then attach all the floor joists to it, then install the second one later. Space is at a premium inside my cabin with all the lumber and osb stacked inside.   When I set the forms for the inner piers … Continue reading Floor joists – Part II: beams and joists

Floor joists – Part I: Rim Joists

Note: This happened before the chinking post, but I got too excited about chinking! So here you go…. The setup Staining is done. Gutters are done. Logs are dry. But the ground inside was staying moist – like, all the time. I thought after I got the roof on things would eventually dry out inside the cabin. Weirdly, they didn’t. Our water table is somewhat high, but not overly high- I dug down 4 feet and didn’t find any water. It must just be “the humid South”. I researched and found that installing a vapor barrier – basically 6 mil … Continue reading Floor joists – Part I: Rim Joists

Staining Logs

It’s been a lot of work getting to this point where we can stain the logs. About 9 months. Why has it taken so long? So many reasons, that I guess I should start at the end of the last major milestone- the roof. Summary: June 2019 – March 2020 I got the roof on June 2019. I had promised myself and my wife that I would finally get that truck working and install the new motor. So I took a month off from the cabin and worked on the truck- replacing parts as I went. I got it running … Continue reading Staining Logs

Girder Log & Girder Support Log

  I estimate the roof of my log home will weigh around 50,000 lbs. In class, they taught us that you need a girder log that is crosswise to the ridge pole to increase the strength of the structure. The girder log is also known as a collar tie. Its job is to keep the walls from spreading apart due to the weight of the roof, as well as to support the second floor. Since we used pulleys, we knew we could install the girder log at any time after we reached second floor height. We decided to wait until … Continue reading Girder Log & Girder Support Log