Part II: Rafters up- new crane guy

Click here to read Part I (where we get the Ridge Pole up)

They sent Chad out to help.  He asked me about the the guy who set the Ridge Pole (RP). I told him the guy’s name, and he laughed- “Oh, yeah, good ol’ Be***! That guy’s afraid of his own shadow.” I was immediately at ease with Chad. Here’s a guy who knows that stuff like this is dangerous, and harping on it doesn’t make anyone safer. We all know it’s dangerous, and we do it anyway, but we try to work smart.

I told him the plan. “First we’re going to set that middle Ridge Pole Support Log (RPSL) right on this pier. I want you to lift it over the wall, but make sure your cable is on the far side of the RP.”

“Why is that?” he asked.

“Ok, so I figure you can lift up and down, but you probably don’t have much control on the back and forth, so I set up this pulley to do that job, but I need the cable on the backside so we don’t pull it all the way through the bottom of the RP,” I explained.

“Makes sense, let’s do it.”

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I’m liking this guy. We get the RPSL hooked up, he reminds me to tie a string to the strap to release it once we’re done, and we’re off. We get it set on the pier in a few minutes.  Then he comes in to fine tune it with me, with my wife supervising. With him on the pulley, and me on the cant hook, we get it placed in a few minutes. I climb up to drill and pin, and that’s it.

I took a little break, thinking I had heat exhaustion: the forecast called for 95, and with the heat index, it was closer to 100 F.  I was dizzy up top, and had to stop several times while hammering the pin into the RPSL. While I took a break, Julie asked if her and my daughter could swing on the crane hook. Chad said, “sure, no problem.” Obviously, he’s a very cool crane operator.

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These cute girls are a ton of fun!

 

Now onto the rafters.

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This is the safest way to install rafters from the ground

I showed him my idea with the loops and the pins. Using this method, I can set the rafters from the ground, and when he releases the pressure on the strap, I can easily just pull on the string, and the pins mostly just fall out. Here’s a video of installing them. Again, he says he’s never seen it done that way, but wants to see what happens. 28 rafters later, he’s convinced to never do it any other way. But I’m getting ahead of myself….

The loop idea works like a charm- I used grade stakes and welded a washer to the end so the string wouldn’t slide off. The string was a 50′ piece of paracord that I could hold onto from the ground, along with the leader rope (which also had a quick release pin). We also ended up tying a wrench to the other quick release string as weight so it wouldn’t get caught on the wall- which happened a half dozen times- I had to climb up to get it, but at least I didn’t have to shimmy out on the rafter, 30 feet up. Releasing the rafter from the ground is much safer.

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The office sent him out with a 12′ spreader bar, even though I asked for a 20′ spreader bar- this bar keeps the legs of the rafters open so they fit over the walls. But 12 feet wasn’t enough, so we ended up putting the far side on first, and then on the count of “3”, he had me pull extra hard on my leader rope, and he dropped the hook at the same time, and we were able to “launch” two sets over the near wall. But it was taking a long time- it’d been 2 hours, and we’d only set four rafters. He called the office and demanded a 20′ spreader bar. I thought the crane would make things easier. It made it faster, but it was still hard. Here’s a video of installing with the wrong spreader bar. After installing a few rafters, we stopped for lunch.

After the guy brought the 20′ spreader bar, the rafters were going up in about 15-20 minutes per rafter. We had a few that we couldn’t set just exactly right, and we realized that I could just move them with a lever later, so we changed the plan to just get them close enough.

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After nine hours of work, we were on the last set. People were stopped in the road, watching. Chad’s two sons came over – he lives literally around the corner. He said sheepishly that he should have come over sooner, but he’s glad he was there that day. Nelton’s wife and daughter came over, too, taking pictures and chatting with my wife. When I pulled the last pin out of the last rafter, I couldn’t help but let out a loud, “whoop! Whoop!”, to which everyone cheered. It felt like an old fashioned barn raising.

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And I got a discount- Chad agreed that we wasted 2 hours with the wrong spreader bar, and that was the crane company’s fault. Also, we got a discount for paying with cash. It was expensive, but very, very worth it.

The next step involves leveling the rafters- the rafters are flat on at least one side, but the RP is tapered and crooked and bowed-  not much, but enough. It’s actually really straight- But it is off by a few inches in spots. That will involve me using string and cutting some of the RP. And then we go for the roof.

 

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Part I: Ridge Pole up, but what a struggle

We decided to go with a crane. I’ve written about how dangerous I thought installing the Ridge Pole myself would be, how long it would take, and how expensive it would be.

I took a Thursday & Friday off work to prepare. Thursday- it took me nearly all day to pull the rafters off the rack, bolt them together, and then lay them out in preparation for the crane to lift them.

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By evening, I had just enough daylight to chain blocks to the RPSL’s as a cradle to hold the RP. But I almost fell when the scaffolding slipped a little, and had to have my wife jump on it to hold it down. Stupid me.

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Friday, the crane showed up a little early. I was up on the front RPSL chain binding a cradle to the top to ensure the Ridge Pole (RP) wouldn’t roll off after the crane released it. As I was binding it, I happened to look at the back RPSL and noticed the front pole that I was on was not in line with the back pole- it was off by about 8″. I guess I hadn’t noticed because when we set the poles, we were going for “mostly” perpendicular. Since this was the first time I had climbed to the top, I had never noticed the little hook about 4′ from the top that made it off-center from the rear.

Anyway, crane guy pulled up, and I asked him what he thought. He went and looked, and agreed it was off by about 8″. Leaving it would mean the whole roof wouldn’t be perpendicular to the house. Probably no one would really notice, but I made an executive decision to fix it right then. I told the crane guy to go ahead and get set up, while I loosened the bolts. I had him hook on to the top of the pole so it wouldn’t fall, then set it in the right spot. I eyeballed it, and had him and my wife check as well. When it was all good, I started drilling new holes and attaching the bolts. We used about an hour to do this part.

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Meanwhile, my wife was using roofing tacks (with big orange plastic heads) to mark every 4′ along the RP, so we could set the rafters from the ground. She also recommended wisely that we leave the 2×4’s we nailed to each end in position- at 12 o’clock (straight up), so we could tell if the RP rolled a bit.

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roofing tacks on the RP- you can see these from the ground.

Then we hooked up the RP to the crane. The crane guy thought it was best to choke the RP with the straps. I don’t know how else we could’ve done it, but I went with it. After a few attempts at lifting it and setting it down, we found the center of the RP, and up it went. I climbed up to help set it- got on top of the house and guided the RP into place. I measured about 7′ out from the RPSL, but noticed that there was a giant knot right where it would touch the RPSL, so I went with 8′. At this point, I should’ve marked it, and then had him set it down so I could saw a flat spot where it would sit on the RPSL. Part of this was my fault- I was worried about how much it was costing (about $120/hr), and the other part was the crane guy giving me disapproving looks every time I did something “dangerous” (hello- the whole project is dangerous). He got to me, for sure- I was feeling weak and nervous up that high, and I never get nervous at heights.

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It went downhill from there- I got the front pinned, then went to the back, and got it pinned. I called him from my cell and asked how much pressure he had holding the RP- “about 700 lbs”, he said. I told him to release it slowly- and as he did, the RP started to roll off the RPSL’s! I had him stop so I could get down. We talked about what to do- he was real nervous about releasing it, and so was I, but we had to move on. So I had him release it all the way. It rolled to almost 2 o’clock (10 o’clock from the front).

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Well, the crane guy flipped out- said it was all unsafe, said rebar wouldn’t hold that thing in place, said we needed an engineer because rebar isn’t that strong. Note: 3/4″ rebar is very strong. Even though I followed the plans – they said 5/8″ rebar was good enough, but I thought 3/4″ was better- either way, there’s a tip I missed that I’ll discuss later. I tried to talk him into setting a few rafters- thinking that would stabilize the RP. I wanted him to roll it back to 12 o’clock with the crane, but he didn’t want to touch it. He shot down all my ideas. In his defense, he promised us 4 hours, but was there for 5.5, and only charged us for 4, so that was nice. But his attitude was awful- he was no help.

He chastised me for climbing up to the RP on a ladder attached to scaffolding, saying, “you sure you want to climb up there?”

At that point, I had had enough, and I shot back, “you gotta better way to release your straps?”

“well, no.”

“I’m serious- if you have a better idea, let me know.” But he just turned around and walked away. I was getting upset- his only help was that he had a crane. He wasn’t helpful with ideas, or experience, or anything else.

He wouldn’t listen to any ideas we had. We were just dumbfounded and frustrated. We had to leave the rafters on the ground, and the RP cockeyed. We had no idea how to fix it. I was completely burned out- heat exhaustion or depression or both. We went home thinking of giving up- ‘if the crane guy can’t help fix the RP, who can?’ we thought. It was overwhelming to think we had come this far only to end up with a cockeyed RP.  On top of that, it rained that night, and there was a little wind with it. I had visions of coming back the next day to find the house smashed and the RP laying on the ground.

I got on the LHBA forum and told them what happened. Everyone pitched in with ideas. I came up with a plan based on the awesome folks on LHBA. After talking to them, it didn’t seem that bad- lots of work, but not the end of the world. Saturday, we went out in the afternoon to see what we could come up with on the RP.  I moved the scaffolding over to the back wall, and threw a 20,000 lb strap over the RP in a choke position. I hoisted up my 60 lb, 2 ton chain hoist to the top of the wall, and used another strap tied to the wall to hook the other end of the chain hoist. With the hoist in the middle, and the RP in a choke, I was able to slowly wind up the chain hoist and roll the RP back to 12 o’clock. Here’s a video of the process. It was very scary moving a 10,000 lb log like that- thinking that it might fall off the RPSL’s or break the rebar, or worse, so I only moved it just a little at a time. Once stable, I climbed back up and drilled another hole next to the first one on the RP- and drove in a 5/8″ x 24″ piece of rebar to the RPSL. The theory is that with two pieces of rebar- if the RP rolls, one rebar pin will compress, and the other will decompress- the two actions will cancel most of the movement from the RP. It was successful, but took a long time to do.

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With that part done, we felt a little more confident. I spent the next few days out in the rain, making my last set of rafters. We discussed ways we could do it ourselves by hand, and without the crane, but with winter coming on, we decided time was money.  So, when we noticed the weather was going to clear, I called the crane guy back. He said he was busy – the rain had pushed all his other jobs back, and he was playing catch up.  He said call him on a Thursday, and he might be able to come Friday. I started calling other crane companies, and even thought I would rent a telehandler and do it myself. All the other crane companies were busy too. In the end, learning to drive the telehandler and maneuver rafters seemed like too much.

All we could do was pray. We had nice weather, the rafters were ready, the RP was stable. But we had no crane available. I had faith that one of the crane companies would have an opening Friday, but they all claimed it would be another week. Thursday, I got a call from the original crane guy, and he said he couldn’t sleep at night thinking about how dangerous what I was doing was. He said for that reason, he had to say no. But I wasn’t dismayed. I called another crane company, and the office lady took all my info and said someone would call. A couple hours later, and a guy calls- says he’s out there at my property, sizing up the job. “You’re going to need a big crane.”

“Can you come tomorrow?” I asked.

“Yeah, we can make it.”

Part II: (link will be active in a few days!) we get the rafters up.