“Houston, we have lift-off”

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The poles are in! I need to thank everyone who helped out. I often feel like I’m a recluse, and I have a hard time in social settings. I’m pretty much an introvert – parties wear me out, while enjoying gardening or working on my own is energizing. I asked around at church last week, and made a couple of pleas asking for help on facebook. I got a commitment of two people by Thursday night, but we needed more- a lot more. I got a couple more Friday night, and a couple of calls Saturday morning. It was humbling to think that these people thought enough of me to come help out. I’m indebted to them, because this is something that I could not do myself.

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L-R: David Bailey, Nathan Forbes, Brian Hill, Jeff Hoki, Maxon Bromley, Jude Collins, Jared Mayfield. (Not pictured: Paul Glotzbach & Julie Hill)

My plan was to do as much work as possible before Saturday so that the tractor could do most of the work, while a few guys held onto the ropes to keep things from going sideways (literally).

The results were mixed- the guys still had to do a lot of work, but when the poles started going up, it went well – and quick. We got all four poles installed in 1.5 hours. Which was great because two of the guys had to leave for other family engagements at 11:00.

A few more details, then I promise to show some pictures:

When I tried it myself, I noticed the log just went right over the hole. I needed a way to get the log to dig into the dirt enough that the tractor could get it upright. I dug some trenches about ten feet long leading down to the hole. Each hole is four feet deep, so I made the trenches go down about three feet, with a one foot drop into the hole. I figured this little shelf would help prevent the pole from continuing past vertical once it was in the hole. I was right!

Along with the trenches, I piled up dirt to get the upper end of the pole off the ground, which also helped the bottom end angle down into the hole.

On the first lift, the tractor couldn’t overcome gravity due to the angle of the cable.  I needed the pole to be higher before the tractor could do its job. Having eight guys to lift the pole high enough and walk it upright was the answer. Once the top end of the pole was about 10 – 15 feet in the air, the tractor did the rest, and the guys on ropes were able to stabilize the pole while I maneuvered the tractor to get the pole straight. Then, the pole slipped into the hole.

Once the pole is in the hole, there’s a little fine tuning to get the pole completely vertical, then I climbed the ladder to remove the lifting cable, while the guys shovel dirt back in around the poles. Maxon was like, “every time you climb that ladder I get nervous”. Wait- you’re not nervous when lifting? 🙂

The whole process took about 20 minutes per pole. My wife helped babysit the children, took great pictures, and then peeled some logs.

First, the trenches and holes:

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Then getting the lifting poles vertical:

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Next up: getting the pressure-treated sill plate installed, then on to stacking logs! Woohoo! This is a major milestone!

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