Finishing Foundation, Getting ready to install Lifting poles

We didn’t have any blowouts on the foundation. I waited seven days for the concrete to dry, and then I started pulling the plywood off the piers. They looked ugly:

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The neighbor even came over to have a look. He said, “you gotta cover those up with mortar- if water gets in there and freezes, it’ll crack your foundation.

“But they’ll be under the house- and there’ll be a ten-foot wide porch to protect them,” I protested.

“Doesn’t matter- humidity in the air can do it, too. The building inspector might not like ’em looking like that,” he reminded me.

I knew he was right, even though I didn’t want him to be right. I bought several bags (like 20) of a structural mortar mix rated at 5500 p.s.i. and started slathering it on. It was no fun.

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It took about 3/4 of a bag to do each pier, and it took about 45 minutes to cover each pier. I also had to dig up the plywood to get it out.

Why so bumpy?

As I dug and slathered, I tried to figure out what happened- why were my piers so bumpy? I think there were two problems: my plans call for “3,000 psi” concrete. But when I called the concrete company, they said they had 2500 psi and 3500 psi. That didn’t make any sense to me, so I asked the guy what the difference was. He said you usually use the 3500 psi for footings, while the 2500 psi was for walls. That still didn’t help- are piers considered footings or are they considered foundations? So I went with the 3500 psi. I think it had a bit more rocks in the mix. That was one problem. The other problem was that I buried the piers in dirt to keep them from floating during the pour. I put collars on them and buried them up to their necks with dirt. This wasn’t a problem except that you’re supposed to use a concrete vibrator to shake the concrete during the pour so you get nice smooth faces when it dries. But the driver said you don’t need that- just bang on the pier form with a hammer or the tip of the shovel, and that will shake it up good enough.  But obviously not- I think the dirt softened the blows, and that’s why the face of the concrete was so bumpy.

Getting Lifting poles ready

Well, I finished up on Saturday morning with the mortar. Next up is installing the lifting poles. First, we had to pick which four logs would be the lifting poles- I wanted small logs that were very straight, minimum of 12″ diameter, and they have to be 30 feet long.  The photos below show the preparation of a lifting pole.

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I also had to dig 4 holes in the corner of the foundation- the holes have to be inside the perimeter of the foundation (because the lifting poles will be on the inside of the walls while lifting). The holes have to be at least 4 feet deep. These are temporary poles, and I’ll cut them down when the walls are complete. I have to install cleats to stop the block and tackle from sliding down the pole. The lifting strap in the photo holds the top pulley. The log hangs from the bottom pulley. Since I’m using triple blocks, the rope goes back and forth 7 times. So, a 30 foot pole needs at least 210 feet of rope. The plus side is that the force needed to lift a 4,000 log is 4,000 / 7  = about 600 lbs total, and since each log is lifted by 2 sets of pulleys, 600 / 2 = 300 lbs for each side, which my tractor can easily handle. To tie off the logs while lifting, I plan on using a prusik knot as a “progress capture knot” to stop the log from dropping when I release the pressure from the tractor.

Next, moving the lifting pole into position:

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And then a fail on getting it vertical. I tried to lift it with the tractor, but the pole just wanted to flop around and not go up. So I tried to get it up on a little bit of an angle, but it was still no good.

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So, we gave up trying to do it ourselves. We need help. I asked at church for some guys to come next Saturday- that gives me a week to prep all four poles with cleats, get them into position, have enough rope ready, and get all the pulleys “reeved” (that means getting the rope attached to the pulleys), and get two more 4′ deep holes ready in the corners. Got my work cut out for me.

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