Cabin Inspiration

Many are probably wondering- “yeah, but what’ll it look like when it’s done?” I don’t know, and that’s actually complicated to answer because a cabin like ours doesn’t really exist yet- for a couple of reasons:

  • This is kind of a “duh”, but every handmade log home is different- just the logs alone have so many differences from build to build- let’s look at a few differences:
    • Our logs don’t look like other logs- species differences: Southern Yellow Pine (afterwards “SYP”) vs Fir, spruce, Ponderosa, Douglas, Cedar, Oak, Poplar, etc.
    • SYP grown in open field, or close together: close together means they don’t put on as many branches (and they don’t get as thick). Out in the open, they spread out which means they have more knots, but the trunks are thicker. This might seem minor, but consider two log homes- one built with 20″ average logs, and the other with 10″ average logs:
      • taper: taper is the how fast the log gets smaller as you measure it from bottom to top (to find the taper, you take the difference between the top and bottom diameter and divide by the total length).  We wanted to shoot for a taper of less than 1% (didn’t happen- most of ours are 2%). Doesn’t seem like much, but most of ours got dangerously close to smaller than 8″ at 42 feet. My rule was minimum of 8″ at 42 feet.
  • Construction method:
    • methods for joining logs- cope, dovetail, milled, D-logs- I went through and researched all of these methods before I settled on the Skip Ellsworth Butt & Pass method. Skip’s is the most durable, has the lowest maintenance level, the easiest. The only thing it’s not is the prettiest: Swedish cope takes the cake on that one. But I think B&P takes the cake on durability.
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  • Maybe those differences are minor to you, so let’s look at plans:
    • Roof- we have settled for the moment on charcoal metal or gun metal gray. This is just a personal preference.
      • Roof material: metal. We had a brief moment of insanity where we thought about cedar…
    • Roof overhang: I was going to go for ten foot overhangs, but now with a wrap around porch, we’ll only need a bit of overhang- maybe 5-7 feet. This is significant- in the South (where we are), you need a lot of overhang to cover the logs- they cannot get wet. Add to that the fact that SYP isn’t that rot resistant, and a wrap around porch becomes a necessity more than a perk. “Oh, you should have used cedar or ponderosa….” Ok, that adds about $15k – $30k to the price because you have to buy them and truck them in. Or you can follow Skip’s advice and “build with what you’ve got”, which is what we are doing.
    • chainsaw-for-building-a-log-home
    • Two story home
      • We could go for a full size second floor- which means our walls would have to be twenty feet tall.
      • Or we could go for a knee wall and only have log walls that are, say, fifteen feet tall. Then the roof angles down in the bedrooms. We aren’t sure where we’ll end up, but this will affect whether the stairs curve or not.
    • And let’s not forget the foundation: Pier, crawlspace, or full foundation:
      • This is dependent on the water table. We decided not to chance flooding, and just go with piers. Then we found out that in the South, piers are recommended because the increased airflow keeps the house cool in the summer. Keeping cool is the name of the game in the South, whereas in the North, freezing your keister off is the name of the game. Hey, nobody said you had to live up North….
    • Other considerations:
      • Our home will be square, as outlined here
      • Size and placement of windows (we just bought 4 windows for $80 at a thrift store, but we will need more. Many LHBA members mix and match windows from various sources to save on costs).
      • Ceiling height on both floors- we want high (9+ feet) ceilings.
      • stove pipe or rock fireplace? And inside or outside? I like the ease of a stovepipe, and I like it inside
      • Ridge Pole Support log (RPSL): inside or outside? Outside, for us, and completely protected by the porch and roof overhang, of course.
      • Rafters made from logs or beams? Logs.
      • The inside floor plan: this is the best part of a log home. Since the outer walls hold the roof up, you can do anything you like with the inside walls and rooms. Our plan is to have the ability to completely live on the first floor, and then have a 3/4 floor upstairs- 3/4’s for living, 1/4 open to living area.

End result for what it will look like? Something of a mix between everything below. I’ll continue to update this post with photos as I find new inspiration. Now, on to the inspiration:

A lot of these photos are from builds by Ronnie Wiley of wileyloghomes.

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brianhill

Just a regular guy from Utah, now living in Alabama, involved in life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

2 thoughts on “Cabin Inspiration”

  1. Love all of your thoughts on these. Did they teach about the RPSL’s being on the outside?? I don’t remember that! Cedar roof~~hehe! The fleeting thoughts that pass quickly~~ wouldn’t that be a maintenance nightmare?!? Yeah, it is pricier with the metal roof, but in the long run, much more worth it. Love seeing your progress, BTW!

    Like

    1. RPSL’s: They don’t recommend it, but said if you keep it covered with a roof overhang and porch, you should be fine. Thanks for the comments!

      Like

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